Author Archives: Jon Guibor

Nuclear Waste Disposal Facilitated by Glass Melting Furnaces.

In the latest technological solution to a decades old problem, researchers have determined that using blast furnace slag through a process called vitrification, can reduce the volume of radioactive material by 90%. This astounding breakthrough in nuclear fuel disposal melts waste down into little cubes of glass making it way easier to dispose of. The current treatment method for non-compactableRead more ›

Bring Heat Treating Capability to your Machine Shop

If you are one of the thousands of machine shops or prototype houses throughout the country that is routinely outsourcing their heat treatment work to expensive labs with long lead times, we have a suggestion for you:  Consider bringing your heat treating capabilities in-house.   Some of the more common processes that machine shops outsource include: Hardening or Tempering ofRead more ›

Batch Furnaces For MIM Production

Batch furnaces for MIM are popular with companies or labs working with a number of different materials and part mixes that require process flexibility. Whereas a continuous furnace presents a fixed temperature along the line of travel, batch furnaces can offer programmable temperature profiles, programmable soak times, and lower overall operating costs. This can be important if you need to makeRead more ›

MIM Furnace Design and Use

CM Furnaces was one of the very first companies in the USA to make a completely automated pusher furnace for MIM that could handle all steps of MIM processing in a single production furnace. This includes almost any reducing atmosphere, as well as being adapted to handle the large amount of binders that are released by the parts. A continuousRead more ›

Powder Metallurgy Sintering Considerations

While the topic of the “hydrogen economy” has heated up in recent years, there is still no conclusive research showing that hydrogen production for fuel is cost effective in the long run. But in the world of industrial furnaces, hydrogen has been a heated topic for fifty years (pun intended…) Pure hydrogen gas (H2) is one of the most effectiveRead more ›

Annealing, Sintering and Calcining Processes

Calcination is one of the most common processes used in the ceramics industry among many others. The most common application for Calcining is the decomposition of calcium carbonate to calcium oxide and carbon dioxide, in order to create cement. The product of calcination is usually referred to as “calcine,” regardless of the actual minerals undergoing thermal treatment. Calcination is carried out in furnaces orRead more ›

High Temperature Furnaces for Technical Ceramics

As anyone involved in the production of technical ceramics knows, the precise high-temperature firing of ceramic material in a furnace is integral to the overall quality of the process. Perhaps the most high-profile example of this would be firing of the heat shield tiles used on the space shuttle. These tiles are formed from pure silica fibers and heated toRead more ›

What is a Muffle Furnace?

While the term “Muffle Furnace” or “Retort Furnace” is still in use today, it doesn’t really mean the same thing as it did in the early 20th century when wood and coal were the primary ways to heat a furnace. A Muffle Furnace’s primary attribute is that it has separate combustion and heating chambers. The “Retort” is a gas sealedRead more ›

Selecting a Glass furnace for batch Production.

The conversion from raw materials to molten glass in the glass fusion process has become more complex and specialized as the range of materials and increasing desire for reproducible quality has progressed in the last decade. Indeed the proper instrumentation and control of glass melting furnaces can yield large savings in fuel and significant increases in throughput. CM Batch andRead more ›

CM Furnaces Helping Solve the Nuclear Fuel Disposal Problem

The U.S. Department of Energy is working to immobilize excess plutonium at its Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of a two track approach for the disposition of weapons usable plutonium. The Plutonium Immobilization process involves the disposition of excess plutonium by incorporation into ceramic pucks. The ceramic pucks, after pressing, are roughly 3-1/2 inches in diameter by 1-3/8 inchesRead more ›