Category Archives: CM Furnaces

What is a Muffle Furnace?

While the term “Muffle Furnace” or “Retort Furnace” is still in use today, it doesn’t really mean the same thing as it did in the early 20th century when wood and coal were the primary ways to heat a furnace. A Muffle Furnace’s primary attribute is that it has separate combustion and heating chambers. The “Retort” is a gas sealed chamberRead more ›

The Use of Furnaces in 3D Printing

While manufacturers scramble to realize the full promise of 3D metal printing with new methods, better throughput and more accuracy, a survey of 3d Printing technology in 2017 shows that Powder Bed Fusion, or Direct Energy Deposition methods still dominate most equipment. Both these methods require a sintering phase where the printed part is purged of catalysts, and non-uniformities introducedRead more ›

Convenience of 3D Printing with High Volume Production

3D Printing for High Volume Production Additive manufacturing or “3D printing” has come a long way since originally introduced in the 1980’s as a method to conveniently create prototype parts out of plastic.. Additive manufacturing can now be used with various materials including metal and ceramics, giving injection molders an alternative process for building parts. With new, highly sophisticated 3dRead more ›

Primer on Strand Annealing Furnaces

In the late 1940’s continuous strand or strip annealing lines came into use in brass producing mills. The modern strand annealing tube furnace has for decades played the dominant role in annealing of wires, ropes and tubes made of stainless steel and nickel alloys. But what is the annealing process and how do CM furnaces specifically facilitate the strand annealingRead more ›

High Temperature Kilns and Furnace Considerations

Guys who’ve been doing ceramics for decades tend to call everything a kiln. Back in the day you could point to some differences between a ceramic kiln and a high temp furnace used for metallurgy. A Kiln had a slow heat-up, a soak period, and a slow cool-down that minimized thermal shock to what were usually thermally sensitive ceramic materials.Read more ›

Sintering Furnace Selection Considerations

High-temperature sintering furnaces  are utilized in powder metallurgy for sintering stainless steel and, in some cases, iron-based materials. They are exclusively used in refractory-metal fabrication of molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium. High-temperature sintering furnaces are also utilized in the nuclear-fuel industry for sintering uranium oxide. The ceramic industry has always used high-temperature processes for sintering, co-firing and metallizing. To properly select andRead more ›

Production Furnace Throughput Defined

It is very common in several industries to discuss the output of a continuous furnace in terms of pounds/hour. This is an interesting number and easy to understand, however, it is misused most of the time. The origins of this output rating came from lower-temperature furnaces, specifically traditional mesh belts. If you were to speak with the belt manufacturers themselves,Read more ›

High-Temperature Sintering Furnaces for Production

For production sintering operations, certain furnace design considerations are common regardless of whether you are working in metals, ceramics, or glass and regardless of what industry you work in. In order to achieve compression without liquefication, accurate temperature control and careful atmosphere monitoring are essential to uniformity and throughput. Furnaces for normal sintering applications are often continuous-belt furnaces like ourRead more ›

Nuclear Waste Disposal Facilitated by Glass Melting Furnaces.

In the latest technological solution to a decades old problem, researchers have determined that using blast furnace slag through a process called vitrification, can reduce the volume of radioactive material by 90%. This astounding breakthrough in nuclear fuel disposal melts waste down into little cubes of glass making it way easier to dispose of. The current treatment method for non-compactableRead more ›

Batch Furnaces For MIM Production

Batch furnaces for MIM are popular with companies or labs working with a number of different materials and part mixes that require process flexibility. Whereas a continuous furnace presents a fixed temperature along the line of travel, batch furnaces can offer programmable temperature profiles, programmable soak times, and lower overall operating costs. This can be important if you need to makeRead more ›